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Native American Pottery

When you allow one of these hand crafted works of art to grace your home, you are not just decorating, you are displaying unique treasures that inspire awe and wonder. These powerful pieces tell a story and they make the viewer want to touch and study them, learning the story of the artist. Our selection of southwest pottery represents beautiful works of art that are unique and hand signed, sure to take your breath away again and again.

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Children at Play
Our Price: $250.00
Dawn Navasie Hopi Pot
Our Price: $660.00
M. Henderson Buhuhungva Lomayestewa Dawn Navasie
Tonita Nampeyo Hopi Pot
Our Price: $879.00
Nampeyo Hopi Pot
Our Price: $1,050.00
J Sahme Nampeyo Hopi Pot
Our Price: $1,150.00
Tonita Nampeyo Nampeyo '84 J Sahme Nampeyo
Burel Naha Hopi Spider Pot
Our Price: $1,290.00
Tom Polacca
Our Price: $3,750.00
Tom Polacca Hopi Pot
Our Price: $5,625.00
Burel Naha Tom Polacca 1935-2003 Tom Polacca 1935-2003
Fannie Nampeyo Hopi Pot
Our Price: $10,000.00
Fanni Nampeyo 1900-1987
   
 
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Nampeyo Pottery

Nampeyo Pottery, dating back to the 1800s, is amazing hand-carved pots in shades of brown, cream, and black that will have you touching and turning over and over again, attempting to decipher its unique message and admiring the soulful beauty of the piece. Nampeyo, known as one of the most renowned Hopi potters, began to master her craft at a very young age. Learning everything she knew from her mother, by the time Nampeyo was 15, she was considered to be a productive working member of her Hopi village. Later in life, while visiting prehistoric pueblo ruins, Nampeyo discovered remnants of pottery. These beautiful pieces of centuries old pottery inspired her to create a new way of pottery making, later referred to as the Sikyatki Revival. Said to be petite and welcoming to outsiders, Nampeyo was famous by the time she was 20 years old and will forever be recognized as a legend in the pottery making industry.

Hopi Pottery

The fascination of Hopi pottery and artifacts began during the late 19th century when the Southwest had been officially discovered by the East. Combined with the Columbian Exposition and the completion of the Santa Fe Railroad, Hopi land in Arizona became increasingly well-known and traveled. In 1879, John Wesley Powell, the director of the Smithsonian Bureau of Ethnology, believed that the Native Americans of the Southwest would soon become extinct. Based on this belief, the government, many large universities and museums, along with archaeologists, anthropologists and other scientists began to collect Southwest materials and artifacts for future study and preservation.

Here at Turquoise de Luchia, our Native American pottery for sale is guaranteed authentic. Other examples of imitation pottery pale in comparison to our Hopi pottery collection. This Southwest pottery is art with a soul, art with a story, art with inspiration.